Starting Your Morning the Right Way: Reflections on Caffeine

In a divided and diverse world, there aren’t many nearly universal human experiences. Yet one may very well be the consumption of caffeine, whether coffee and tea, first thing in the morning. Then another later in the day. And maybe one more. However, how exactly is caffeine impacting the human body? Is all caffeine created equal?

Over the course of hundreds of years, the consumption of caffeine has become integrated with cultural traditions, social life, and general human behavior. Found in obvious places such as coffee and tea, and less discernible ones like chocolate or guarana berries, the consumption of caffeine is a daily occurrence. In the United States alone, 85% of adults consume caffeine daily with the average amount being around 1.5 cups of coffee. It is in brewed black coffee the highest amount of caffeine is found, with 235 milligrams of caffeine per 12 ounces. A list found crafted by the Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, National University of Singapore describes the most common sources of caffeine in descending order, working from the aforementioned black coffee, to other types of coffee, to teas, and then more sugary energy drinks or chocolate.

Caffeine, and coffee specifically, have long been a topic of debate in the health community. Concerns regarding caffeine’s potential contributions to cardiovascular diseases or cancers have persisted, yet in recent years there have also been studies published in support of caffeine. It is important to consider that all coffee is not created equal, with some coffee compounds offering gut friendly microbiome benefits or aide in boosting the metabolism, while others can affect cholesterol levels.

It is well known that caffeine can sharpen cognitive performances for an extended period of time, but it also can contribute to insomnia and anxiety for those susceptible. Furthermore, it is recommended to be careful with caffeine consumption during pregnancy, as it may reduce fetal growth or increase the risk of pregnancy loss. On a more positive note, metabolic research portrays that caffeine may be beneficial to weight loss due to its appetite reducing properties and raising an individual’s basal metabolic rate. The aforementioned study from the Yong Lin School of Medicine details many more points of contention, seeing both the pros and cons to caffeine.

When considering the benefits or detriments to caffeine consumption, it is essential to consider one’s health holistically. A proper consumption of caffeine depends on the person, though consuming overly sugary or modified beverages is never recommended. If you are curious about your own personal relationship with caffeine, and how it affects your body individually, reach out to the experts at Pria Wellness. They can work with you todetermine the best, safest way to boost your energy levels. Contact us on our website or reach out with a phone call to 410-565-6552 today.

Information sourced from the Saw Swee Hock School of Pub- lic Health and Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, National University of Singapore and National University Health System, Singapore, published in the New England Journal of Medicine.


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